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Old Post Office Tower and Pennsylvania Avenue Safari by Smartphone

Photograph the DC skyline from the second tallest structure in DC, in the heart of the National Mall!

Quick Details

Photographer
$69

Guess what?! The National Park Service has reopened the Old Post Office Clock Tower after more than 2 years of closure during the COVID pandemic.

If you have never been up there, you are in for a great treat! At 315 feet tall, it is the second highest structure in Washington DC’s height-restricted skyline, and it offers a 360-degree view of Washington DC, looking east to the U.S. Capitol down Pennsylvania Avenue, looking west to the Washington Monument and right into the heart of the National Mall.

And, because of the thin metal strips along the windows that prevent you from falling out of the tower, the best way to photograph these views is with the narrow lens of your smartphone camera! (The wider lenses of regular cameras will be obstructed by the strips)

Our safari will begin at the Federal Triangle METRO exit, where architectural photographer and WPS Director E. David Luria will guide you to great shots of the nearby Ronald Reagan International Trade Center, some ground level views of Pennsylvania Avenue itself, and beautiful shots of the Old Post Office Building (now a Waldorf Astoria Hotel) framed in the arches of the Federal Triangle building.

Then we will end our safari by entering the Old Post Office Building and taking an elevator up to the Clock Tower to photograph all the views we can get from that lofty spot, views ALMOST as good as those from the top of the 550-foot tall Washington Monument! And we also get to peer down and photograph the huge interior atrium of the building and the lobby and restaurant of the Waldorf Astoria.

Here are samples of the shots you will get on this safari

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72177720299827527/with/52148562542/

Limited to clients with smartphones, or to clients with DSLR/mirrorless cameras that own fast, big-aperture lenses like F1.8 of f1.2 that can see right through the metal strips.